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Industry Innovators

Mathew Gerson: Bringing Women Pleasure & Pain Relief with Cannabinoids

Mathew Gerson is the founder and CEO of Foria, a company that produces non-psychoactive cannabis products for women’s sexual health and pleasure.

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Mathew Gerson
PHOTO | Courtesy Foria
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Five years ago, Mathew Gerson launched Foria, a new category of non-psychoactive cannabis products for women’s sexual health and pleasure. In the few years since, the company’s formulations have won numerous awards and earned global notoriety, all while innovating solutions for women’s wellness and inspiring a Harvard researcher-led study on the efficacy of cannabinoids for menstrual pain relief.

The company develops THC and CBD-infused products, which include suppositories, vape pens, and sensual oils. By re-introducing cannabis into the sex lives of many, he found that he had stumbled upon an age-old therapy, one that proved beneficial to millions in modern society.

Prior to becoming a social entrepreneur, Gerson spent 10 years studying Buddhist meditation in Asia and throughout North America. His first venture after leaving the contemplative life was a project dedicated to responsible, pleasurable sex, founding Sir Richard’s Condom Company, which produced all-natural, vegan-certified condoms and more. Gerson describes the enterprise as a “conscious condom company, sort of like Tom’s shoes for condoms.” Sir Richard’s helps to address the unmet need for condoms globally with a “buy one, give one” business model.

THC for TLC

After that, Gerson continued his dedication to positive change by addressing another unmet need: women’s pain and pleasure. He founded Foria in Venice Beach, CA in 2014, and the brand is credited with bringing the first cannabis-infused intimacy oil to market — a process which, he explained, started in 2011 as a kitchen experiment.

After learning about the medicinal properties of cannabis, Gerson realized, “There was so much more to (cannabis) than THC. Turns out there’s actually a long history of cannabis use in birth and gynecology, from the Victorian era to the ancient Egyptians, from the oracle at Delphi to ‘broom-riding witches’ (medicine women who applied herbals salves via a wooden dildo to achieve euphoric visionary states, a.k.a. ‘flight’).”

Inspired by the historical celebration of cannabis as an aid for intimacy, Gerson cooked up a blend of coconut oil and THC and shared it with a number of female friends. “All reported amazing results,” he says.

Those results, combined with a lack of products for women on the market, were the impetus for Foria. In 2014, the company officially released Pleasure, a first-of-its-kind sensual enhancement oil.

The product was formulated with a specific focus on female arousal. “The oil is ideally suited to the unique anatomy of women or anyone with a vulva,” said Gerson.

At the time of its release, “there were over 20 FDA-approved drugs for male sexual challenges and a total of zero for women,” Gerson noted.

Pleasure was created to address the “orgasm gap” between men and women. “The pleasure gap is an issue with wide-ranging causes,” says Gerson.  “Our culture and media view sexuality from an almost exclusively male perspective.” While Big Pharma offers countless Viagra-style drugs for men, there’s next to nothing for women’s arousal challenges—let alone menstrual or sexual pain, he notes.

Each ingredient in Pleasure — and all Foria products — is organic or grown to organic standards, and rigorously tested for purity, which is especially important due to the intimate nature of the products. Also due to the product’s nature (a topical), effects are non-psychoactive. But as some users report, the application might cause a mild, euphoric body high.

Foria clients experience heightened or renewed pleasure and orgasm with Pleasure. But many of them also experience profound relief from conditions like endometriosis and vaginismus, says Gerson.

While Foria initially set out to harness the power of cannabinoids for intimate pleasure, customer reviews quickly revealed the oil to host therapeutic benefits for pelvic pain and discomfort. Foria listened and in response, invented a separate product, Relief, the first cannabis-infused vaginal-suppository for menstrual cramps and discomfort.

The CBD-only version of Relief will soon be the focus of a first-of-its-kind observational study at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital, says Gerson.

In the meantime, Foria continues to push the boundaries of health and wellness for its customers — thanks to user feedback, an integral part of their business model.

“All of our research and development comes as a result of a dialog with our community of clients to better understand both their experiences and their needs,” Gerson explained.

Going Global

So, when people from around the world inquired about shipping Foria’s products overseas, the company developed THC-free versions of their dispensary-only products, made with broad-spectrum CBD from organic, U.S.-grown hemp.

Included in Foria’s line of CBD products is a THC-free version of Relief and an arousal oil named Awaken. Awaken combines CBD with eight other plants for what Gerson calls “the ultimate, multi-botanical entourage effect.”

The primary ingredient in Awaken is a proprietary kava kava extract, which Gerson says stimulates the same receptors as THC. The formula also incorporates cardamom (an anti-inflammatory); ginger (antispasmodic and warming), peppermint (cooling), vanilla (soothing) and cacao (which also affects the endocannabinoid system).

Close communication with their consumer base also motivated Foria to create Explore, anal suppositories (which come with both THC and CBD). “We’d heard from clients who were freezing Pleasure in ice-cube trays to make rectal suppositories,” Gerson explained. “Now, there are a lot of different reasons people take cannabis rectally, but their goal was to enhance anal play.”

Both THC and CBD influence nerves and blood vessels, says Gerson, and they really work well together for pleasure and pain relief. “But we formulated Explore with a lot of CBD because that really helps to relax smooth muscle tissue,” he adds.

The feedback about Awaken and Foria’s new CBD suppositories is deeply moving, says Gerson. A week doesn’t go by where the company isn’t hearing from women, some “who no longer need to take massive doses of Ibuprofen every month,” and others who “are finally able to experience pain-free sex for the first time in their lives—and this inspires us to continue developing new formulas and delivery formats based on this feedback.”

Foria’s THC products have proven so effective that gynecologists and sex therapists in California and Colorado recommend them to patients. Gerson looks forward to a future where doctors nationwide can do the same — but in the meantime, Foria will continue to push the boundaries of modern medicine.

Industry Innovators

Casey Georgeson: Setting a Higher Standard for Clean, Green Beauty

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Casey Georgeson

Casey Georgeson is the CEO and Founder of Saint Jane, a luxurious, 100% clean CBD beauty collection that has taken the CBD beauty category by storm since its launch in January 2019.

You could say entrepreneurialism is in her DNA. Coming from the Ernest and Julio Gallo wine family dynasty, Georgeson has spent her career developing beauty brands for Sephora, including Marc Jacobs, Disney for Sephora as well as the hugely successful wine brand, Cupcake Vineyards.

Georgeson is passionate about the powerful benefits of CBD and whole plant science. I spoke to her about her journey to becoming a cannabis entrepreneur, the importance of transparency and the story behind Saint Jane.

CA: Tell me about your journey through entrepreneurship and how you found your way to cannabis.

Casey Georgeson: My family has a history of entrepreneurship. My great-grandmother was a mail-order bride from Italy (yes that was a real thing!) who came over in the 1900s. She and my great-grandfather grew grapes in the San Joaquin Valley with their seven children. At the end of The Prohibition, still in the Great Depression, she saw an opportunity to use their vineyards for winemaking. She took out a $10,000 loan, using the farm as collateral. She gave $5,000 to her sons, the Franzia brothers, to start a winery; and $5,000 to her son-in-law, Ernest Gallo, to start a winery with his brother, Julio.

Essentially, a 4’10” mail-order bride started two of the largest wine companies out there. That story always resonated with me and even though I never had the chance to meet her — I’ve always admired the confidence it must have taken to do that as a woman in the 1930s. My uncle was also an entrepreneur and I learned a great deal from him throughout the years, watching him create a business.

I started my career as a producer for CNN and got into the wine industry as a brand creator where I developed a brand called Cupcake Vineyards. I went to business school at Stanford and interned at Sephora. It was there that I had this extraordinary training in the beauty industry and in product development and formulations. Once I graduated, I worked at Kendo, Sephora’s brand incubator. My role was to sit as the liaison between the brands we partnered with — Marc Jacobs, Elizabeth and James, Disney, Hello Kitty, Kat Von D— and articulate their vision in the world of beauty and that would ultimately lead to the building of their brands.

I had been creating brands for many years and thought I want to create my own brand at some point. It might be beauty. It might be wine. I just knew I wanted to do something on my own, but it had to be a really big idea.

When I discovered CBD in 2017, I first began really thinking about creating my own brand. It all started when I read a PopSugar article on CBD. The headline was, NATURE’S XANAX MEETS ADVIL. I was like, what is this natural miracle molecule? I immediately went to the dispensary and said to the budtender, “Show me everything you have that’s high CBD, low THC.” They showed me all these products that were really crunchy and hippie. Some formulated for the skin, some ingestible. This was in 2017.

Next to all these products that the budtender put out, was a list of all the things CBD was purported to do. You know that list, it’s very impressive and kind of shakes you to your core. Inflammation. Pain. Sleep. Anxiety. Gut health. Sleep. I thought, ‘If CBD does even one of these things, it is truly one of the most powerful skincare ingredients of our time.’ For topical use, most of the products dealt with pain management and were paired with MCT oil, because it was the easiest and it’s what was most commonly used for ingestibles. But, at the time, nobody was formulating with true skincare ingredients that would be at the level of something you would find at a luxury retailer.

That’s when I saw the opportunity. I would pair CBD with other really potent botanicals, that support the CBD mission for the skin, I knew it was an incredible idea. I went deep into learning about CBD and botanicals and Saint Jane was born.

What a journey! Can you tell me a little about the name Saint Jane?

Saint Jane has two meanings.

One, it’s the innocent side of Mary Jane, because CBD will not get you high.

Two, Saint Jane was an actual person in 1500s France. She was anointed into sainthood for healing people. Specifically, healing women, which society would otherwise never touch: the old, the very sick, unwed mothers. She dedicated her whole life to healing. Her story has been very inspiring to us because our products focus on nurturing, healing and we have a very authentic female empowerment story, as well. I have three daughters and the company is comprised of all women.

It’s truly a gift to have Saint Jane’s legacy as a foundation for the brand. Our approach is healing-centric and the way we’ve expressed that through the brand feels very authentic.

How amazing that you can pay homage to somebody who otherwise would’ve been forgotten in the mists of time, that’s beautiful.

The idea of reimagining this woman who was so important to society and culture for her to devotion to helping people, through this modern lens, is really inspiring. I had 16 years of Catholic school, yet I’m not religious. But this has inspired a renewed faith for me… in our own mission for women as Saint Jane.

What makes Saint Jane different from other CBD skincare products on the market?

I think the biggest difference is the way we’ve crafted the products. It’s about the whole plant story and other botanicals that we pair with CBD. It’s not just CBD for the sake of it. We thoughtfully match CBD with botanicals that support the cannabinoid’s mission of calming, soothing and nurturing the skin.  The botanicals work in concert.

We’re also passionate about full-spectrum CBD — the whole plant extract — because we believe in the entourage effect. Rich endocannabinoid receptors in the skin benefit from those minor cannabinoids found in full-spectrum products.

We also believe in higher concentrations of CBD. When we started, there were a lot of debates around topicals and dosages. It felt so instinctual to me that a higher concentration would be most efficacious for the skin. My background in beauty taught me about performance and the end benefit. If your product works, you’re going to have people come back to you. I believe that our results-driven formulas really express that.

We’re also 100% clean. Our philosophy around clean is also non-negotiable. My second daughter was born very small, underweight. It’s called ‘Small for Gestational Age’ (SGA). We were terrified by that because my older daughter had been born at a normal weight. Juliet was shockingly tiny. We kept trying to figure out why and one of my doctors asked if I had been exposed to any chemicals while pregnant.  At the time, I was developing fragrances, nail polishes. So, I flashback to those windowless offices where I was developing those products and I couldn’t tell anyone I was pregnant yet — it was my first trimester. In the end, we’ll never know; it was inconclusive if there was a correlation. But since then, clean has been non-negotiable and if I was going to create my own product line and collection, it needed to be as clean as it gets. My daughter is amazing and thriving today, but I never would want someone else to go through that. Clean is essential to our ethos.

Transparency and testing are the last ones. Trust is important to us. It took me a long time to get comfortable with the vendors and suppliers that I chose when I started Saint Jane. Back before the Farm Bill, it was really like the Wild West. I didn’t know who to trust as I was getting these packages of white powder delivered to my home. Or these full-spectrum extracts in syringes. I went through my own vetting process with vendors. My mission was to find the best of the best. I retested everything myself with third-party vendors and was shocked to see what I received was often different from what the paperwork stated.

That integrity of testing has stayed integral to the brand since we launched. We test four times during the supply chain to make sure everything is matching up and that we can stand behind everything were putting out there. Every batch is different and we have to stay true to that dedication to the integrity behind it.

Saint Jane has just been stocked by Sephora stores. Congratulations on such an amazing achievement. Can you tell me about that process?

Sephora has been an amazing partner, they’ve been incredibly insightful about our brand, they see our potential, so it’s been really rewarding to work with them. Being in Sephora stores is a huge validation. We’re still so small, still so indie and we are just getting started. Even though I had Sephora experience, I didn’t think they’d take a little brand like ours within our first year. It’s very full circle for me and we’re so grateful for their partnership.

The retailers we work with have been incredibly supportive across the board, too. As a CBD brand, we can’t operate like other normal indie skincare brands with Facebook, Instagram and Google advertising, so our retailers have been our storytellers. They’ve been our platform for brand awareness. We feel so grateful.

You recently announced Dr. June Chin has joined the team as your Chief Medical Advisor. Can you tell me about what that means for Saint Jane?

Dr. Chin is a recognized name in the cannabis space. She’s a longtime advocate of CBD and its healing potential — and not just in skincare. Because we pride ourselves on clean clinical-grade formulas, it made sense to partner with a doctor who shares our passion. She’s just been next level on understanding the power of the plant and has a background in plant-based medicine. CBD is one of the many plant-based ingredients that she’s passionate about. It’s been extraordinary to see the product through her eyes and getting it right as we don’t want to take a misstep on information. We want to make sure we’re architecting the narrative of CBD’s efficacy in the right way.

Who is Saint Jane aimed and why?

I would say we hope to reach people who want to transform their skin, with the powerful benefits of CBD. People are becoming more and more aware of CBD’s potential and we have an extensive range of customers who use it and are loyal to us. Luxury Beauty Serum is our hero product and it’s focused on skin condition and treatment. It has 20 botanicals that all focus on reducing irritation, balancing and detoxifying the skin. We have customers in their twenties through to their seventies who are all using our products and seeing results.

If you’re having a bad moment with your skin, it can impact on your confidence. It must be amazing to have made something that has an impact on someone’s life.

Hearing from customers has been the most rewarding thing since starting the brand. I talk about it a lot with my team. That’s why we’re doing it, to help people. And that’s the legacy of Saint Jane that we’re trying to honor.

What’s next for Saint Jane?

We have so many things coming up on the horizon. I have more ideas than I’m allowed by my team to bring to market. It’s really about staying focused and disciplined on what we bring to market, to make sure that everything we introduce meets our standards.

How do you think the cannabis industry as a whole can be better?

For one, there is a lot of product out there that is not being produced and marketed responsibly. The products that work and are responsibly crafted are going to rise to the top and gain customer loyalty. I think as an industry we are architecting transparency and how brands communicate integrity. As an industry, we need to make sure we can have standards that ensure quality, education, transparency and as much consistency as we can with a highly botanical product. I want founders, I want companies, other brands to rise to the occasion, to honor the potential of CBD.

As the saying goes, “the rising tide will lift all ships” and that’s what I believe will happen.

What trend do you predict for the CBD and cannabis skincare market in the next five years?

My biggest hope is that CBD is regarded as a skincare ingredient like Vitamin C or Peptides. That’s number one. It deserves a place in that roster.

Number two, there are so many benefits to the minor cannabinoids found in the plant, like CBG and CBN. I think we’re just getting started in terms of understanding the benefits found in the entire plant. As a brand, we’re looking deeply into that. There are benefits that have not been fully explored yet. It’s exciting and in the next year, the next five, we’re going to learn a lot about the minor nutrients in the whole plant.

People like you are setting the standard of this next generation of cannabis products.

Thank you, we’re trying. And, we are willing to put in the work to accomplish this.

What do you wish you knew when you started out in cannabis entrepreneurship?

I think there’s entrepreneurship and then there’s cannabis entrepreneurship. I would say with entrepreneurship, you have to be so comfortable with ambiguity and uncertainty. Becoming a founder is committing to a lot, essentially a new life.  You’ve got to be ready to ride the rollercoaster, get used to not sleeping. The cannabis side is its own endless roadblocks, with payment processing issues, advertising headwinds, which I didn’t expect. I wish I’d know some of the challenges we were going to be up against.

Any pearls of wisdom that you’d like to bestow to other women who want to enter the cannabis industry?

Do it. Do it! Do it! Do it! There’s a fabulous group of women as leaders in the cannabis industry. There’s a real sense of community and I think that is unique. It’s very unique in beauty, certainly – which as an industry is comprised of mostly men. There’s so much opportunity out there. It is like post-Prohibition. Think about how many wine brands, alcohol brands, spirits, beer, have launched since prohibition. This is a new time, a new era. I think CBD benefits women so deeply. There’s something about the molecule and women that’s so powerful. It’s a very unique combination. I would say yes….  if you see an opportunity, go for it!

Finally, what are three things it takes to be a cannabis entrepreneur?

Patience. Agility. Integrity. I would say these are the top three. It has to go deeper than just being a market opportunity or a buzzword.  In cannabis, you have to be doing it for the right reasons in order to break through and to endure the saturation that’s coming.

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Industry Innovators

Cheri Sicard: Cannabis Activism Never Tasted So Good

Renowned cannabis chef and activist Cheri Sicard has launched a new website to help eductae people on how to create their own edibles and topicals.

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Cheri Sicard
PHOTO | Cheri Sicard

There’s no such thing as an edible that’s effective for everyone. Cheri Sicard, aka Cannabis Cheri, knows this well — and she’s teaching others how to perfect infusions that work for each individual.

Her at-home recipes and do-it-yourself projects have earned her the title of the “Martha Stewart of Weed“.

But, Sicard wasn’t always a proponent of the plant. In fact, she was “once one of the pot-averse females she’s now aiming to educate,” reports the Daily Beast. 

“Be Involved, Be Educated, Celebrate”

Before she became the acclaimed foodie, activist and entrepreneur she is today, she traveled the world as a variety arts performer in the circus, and as a magician and mentalist. 

“The circus is a traveling melting pot,” says Sicard.

 That’s where she realized her passion for food. In addition to visiting local marketplaces, she says, “I would hang out with a lot of the matriarchs of the families, and I learned how to cook all these ethnic foods.”  

She combined her love for food, and writing — and in 1996, founded FabulousFood.com, one of the largest online recipe sites at the time.

In 2002, Sicard’s first book, The Great American Handbook, was published. The book is described as a guidebook to patriotism, and offers 101 suggestions on how to be involved, educated, and how to celebrate American heritage.

She also authored U.S. Citizenship for Dummies (2003), The Low Carb Restaurant Guide (2004), Everyday American (2008), and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Easy Freezer Meals (2011), among other books. 

After making a career of teaching others about cuisine, and citizenship — she made the move into the cannabis space where her mantra, “be involved, be educated, celebrate,” still resonates. 

Closeted Smoker to Educated Activist

Cannabis entered Sicard’s life in her late 30s.

“I came late to the party,” she explains. Aside from an occasional toke at a soiree, she says she never really consumed it — not until her doctor recommended it for chronic nausea.

“It worked for that, plus a whole lot of other things,” she says, including gastrointestinal issues, and symptoms of depression.

“It dramatically changed my life,” Sicard adds. 

But, she was raised on Reefer Madness. Despite the positive effects she experienced, Sicard still worried she was harming herself by using cannabis. 

“That’s when I immersed myself in the subject, and I realized I had been taught a lie,” she says. “That really pissed me off.”

Cheri Sicard: Political Junkie on a Mission

What rattled her most was that her earlier work focused on how the U.S. is supposed to work. Once she learned the truth about the Drug War, she says, “I couldn’t shut up about it.”  

Sicard went from being a closed smoker to an outspoken activist. “I haven’t been back since,” she adds.

She turned her anger into activism and began advocating for prisoners currently serving life sentences for cannabis offenses. 

For the most part, the public is unaware that there is such a thing as people who are serving life for pot, Sicard explains. “When I tell people, it’s shocking to them. They think, ‘There’s got to be more involved, there’s got to be dead bodies somewhere.’ But no — it’s just for marijuana.

Sicard works to raise awareness, and rally public support via social media for those serving life for cannabis. 

Whether it’s organizing fundraisers or garnering support for clemency efforts, Sicard’s goal is to “to make sure [the prisoners] know that the public is watching.”

The work is rewarding, Sicard explains, “We’ve seen a lot of victories.” However, there is a long way to go toward righting the wrongs of the Drug War. 

This is where her experience as an entertainer helps serve her in her advocacy work. “The show goes on no matter what,” she explains. “No matter how discouraging it gets, you can’t give up.”

Evolving into a Cannabis Foodie

When cannabis became part of her life, it became part of her food, too.

Naturally, Sicard began to cook with cannabis. Though she was an experienced cook and professional recipe developer — she had to learn the basics of combining the two.

“There wasn’t great information out there at the time. Most of the cookbooks out there weren’t great, and had conflicting information,” she adds. “I had to learn what worked and what didn’t on my own.”

She had her fair share of failures. One of which she describes on her newly launched Cannademy website. 

“[…] When I first started trying to cook with cannabis, there was a great three-day camp-out music festival that a lot of my friends can barely remember. That’s because most of them slept through it.” 

Sicard explains that was due to overestimated tolerances, and her lack of knowledge about making edibles for a crowd.

She learned there’s no one size fits all model for edibles. So, she began to hone-in simple, effective recipes.

That’s when she made her move the world of cannabis and food, becoming a leader in infused recipe development for home chefs. 

In 2012, she self-published The Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook, followed by Mary Jane: The Complete Marijuana Handbook (2015), and most recently, The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (2018).

Her books have gained mainstream attention; Mary Jane is sold at Urban Outfitters, and the Easy Cookbook became the top seller in its category after its release. 

Now, Sicard is taking her skill sets to digital audiences through a series of online courses.

A Pretty Magical Thing

Sicard’s courses focus on the nuances of cooking with cannabis. Topics currently range from skincare to easy cooking for home chefs. She even offers a free course on how to properly dose edibles.

Sicard aims to help consumers who are confused, and inundated with bad information or experiences.

She believes that there’s no such thing as an infused product that works for everyone. This is, in part, why she is focused on teaching others how to create — and properly dose — their own infusions.

Affordability is also a motivation.

Learning how to create your own topicals, for example, can be cost-effective and work just as well or better than products on the market because recipes can be personalized, Sicard explains. 

What sets her courses apart from others is that she directly consults and troubleshoots with her students. 

Because everybody reacts differently, she says, “I really try to focus on where that spot is for them — which can be a pretty magical thing.” 

A personal, and fan-favorite topical recipe is her Lavender Green Tea Whipped Cannabis Body Butter, which is made with Matcha Green Tea powder, beeswax, and hemp seed oil among other ingredients. 

Sicard teaches a free course on how to make the body butter at home with three basic ingredients: coconut oil, cannabis, and tapioca flour or cornstarch. She also offers a tutorial on how to upgrade the recipe with essential oils, extracts, teas and more.  

In terms of dishes, Sicard’s favorites are savory and spicy infusions, like pizza, or barbeque shrimp, she shares. 

She does have a foodie pet peeve; Gummies, or fat-free infusions. 

“Cannabis is better in foods that contain fat,” she explains.

That’s because cannabinoids, like THC and CBD, are fat-soluble, meaning they need fats to dissolve and become bioavailable.

In fact, a recent University of Minnesota study finds that “CBD exposure is vastly increased when CBD is taken with high fatty foods.”

Because of that, Sicard warns consumers to steer clear of fat-free edibles; “Down with fat-free gummies!”  

Sicard credits her success to her brutal honesty. She won’t give you any bullshit, she assures. While she admits that people don’t always like what she tells them, it’s a definite strength in an industry so wrought with misinformation.

Her advice to others is not to be hesitant about cannabis as she was. 

“Get over that. This is something that is good for you. It’s healthy and has long term preventive health benefits.”

Cannabis should be celebrated, not treated as a vice, she says. 

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Industry Innovators

Peter Barsoom: Engineering Edibles & Elevating Expectations

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PHOTOS | 1906

Continuing cannabis legalization has seen a boom in innovation and product development. One of the categories that has benefited the most is edibles. Gone are the days of freaking out from one too many weedy brownies. Modern edibles are healthier and more effective, in direct response to consumer demands. They are discreet, measured and the consumer experience and expectations can be precisely dialed in.

Peter Barsoom is the CEO of 1906, one of Colorado’s most successful and innovative edibles companies. 1906 has just released a groundbreaking product that marks a quantum leap for cannabis medicine: 1906 Drops that utilize pharma technology.

Cannabis Aficionado spoke to Barsoom about being first to market, his stance on social responsibility and cannabis entrepreneurialism.

Tell us about your journey through entrepreneurship and how you found your way to cannabis?

Prior to cannabis, I spent 20 years in finance in New York. The idea of getting into the cannabis market was really my wife’s idea. We came up to Colorado in mid-2014 and immediately realized how amazing the quality of the flower that was available to consumers. We wanted to create an edibles experience that was parallel to the amazing flower we had available to us — that’s when we started 1906.

Can you tell us a little about the name 1906?

1906 was the year the Wiley Act — also known as the Pure Food and Drug Act — was passed, which effectively started the prohibition of cannabis. Our mission is to do two things: bring awareness to the last 100 years of prohibition and also to bring cannabis back to its pre-prohibition status as a mainstream substance.

In your own words, what makes 1906 different from other edible companies on the market?

We focus on three things to attract a larger group of cannabis consumers for whom it could be an alternative for either alcohol or pharmaceuticals

Number one is great flavor. Because our product is food, it should taste like food and be healthy like the food we want to put in our bodies.

Two, it should deliver a specific effect. People use cannabis not just for getting high. People use it to help with sleep, give some relief from pain, help with anxiety, a boost of energy — there’s a specific reason why you or I use cannabis and it’s not just for “getting high.”

Third is that it’s fast-acting. Because I’m a New Yorker, I believe patience is a virtue and you shouldn’t have to wait for 60 minutes to 90 minutes for your edibles to kick in.

Can you go into detail on your patented ‘microencapsulation technology’ and the role it plays in your edibles?

Microencapsulation is the technology that we utilize that comes from the pharmaceutical world. Pharma knows how to make drugs get into your system faster. Or, in some cases, the extended release version.

We licensed the technology from a Canadian bioscience company, which is called a lipid microencapsulation. What that means is, by combining cannabis with the medium-chain fatty acid, it allows it to bypass or skip digestion, and get into your bloodstream faster.

Also, it avoids the degradation of the cannabinoids by your stomach acid, so you get more of the cannabinoids into your bloodstream.  You could almost think of it is as like a bullet train, where the cannabinoids are passengers that get into your bloodstream much faster and are protected more than the normal digestion.

Tell us about your exciting new product, the first medical cannabis pills on the market?

Yup, that’s correct. It really is very simple. At one level, it’s revolutionary. Another level, it’s as normal as anything else.

As Americans, we have four and a half billion prescriptions annually. Most of those come in what format? Pills that we swallow. The predominant way that Americans take medicine is in a pill form. It could be your pill for your cholesterol, your pill for sleep, your pill for anxiety. It was always odd to me that as cannabis is medicine, why wasn’t it available in the traditional medicinal format?

The second thing came from our consumers, which is that our consumers were asking for a vegan, gluten-free, portable, discreet way to take 1906. Maybe it’s somebody who can’t take chocolate because they have hypoglycemia, or they’re somebody who’s going out on a hike and can’t take chocolate pretzel because those will melt. There were a whole bunch of cases and demands from consumers for different products.

Pills are the way that we Americans consume our medicine. So, Drops was born from that work, bringing to the market a discreet, portable, vegan, gluten-free, something-you-can-swallow format.

Drops are the first cannabis pills on the market.

So, you’re reaching a new audience that doesn’t necessarily buy edibles or smoke flower or vape. But they’ll happily take a cannabis pill.

So true.  For a lot of people, it feels more accessible and acceptable in that format.

How’s the response been?

Phenomenal. We’ve had great, great feedback from the stores, and from our customers, so far. We have something that will resonate.

Where are they currently available?

Only in Colorado.

Any expansion plans?

Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois and New Jersey will all be rolling out over 2020. Those are very exciting markets. There’s a great demand for these products in the new, young markets that are beginning to legalize. We can build the brand on the East Coast.

Can you tell us more about your GROW cannabis program?

We’ve developed a program called GROW Cannabis, which stands for Generate Real Opportunity for Working in Cannabis. This is for those individuals who’ve been negatively impacted by the War on Drugs. It was never a War on Drugs — it was a war on people. The people who’ve been negatively impacted, who are now out in society, their lives have been significantly damaged. The opportunities lost, the time that they spent in prison and so forth, is truly an injustice.

We think we have a responsibility to help those who’ve been incarcerated, to get back into society, through employment. This industry will create thousands of new jobs. Why not create a training program, so those people can gain real employment in this industry? So that’s what we’re doing. We’ll be launching next year in New Jersey, to get the program right and then we’ll be rolling it out in other areas.

As a New Yorker, what are your thoughts on the current situation in that state?

It’s hard. Every other state, besides Illinois, has done it through a ballot intuitive. It is very hard… it’s so political. I totally get it, the challenges they have. It takes a little while. It will happen. It takes like two years.

How can the cannabis industry, as a whole, be better?

I think it’s about remembering the community and how we got here. We got here because a lot of people were unfortunately incarcerated. That makes for a unique perspective. How we give back to the community? We’re creating a new industry, so we get to write new rules for it.

What trends do you predict for cannabis, going into the ‘Roaring Twenties’?

You know, I have… all I know is, it’s all being dictated by consumers. That’s where we’re seeing changes. The demand for legalizing, the demands for social use, the delivery, other options like that. If we’re looking into where consumers are, that’s what predicts what the future looks like.

With your experience, what do you see happening in the cannabis industry 1, 5 and 10 years from now?

I think in the next year, we’ll see something happen at a federal level — maybe not legalization, but maybe banking. In 10 years, we’ll start to see places where people can consume both cannabis and alcohol, in the same place. That will transform social use. It will transform how we gather… I think we will see beverages be a much larger way in which people consume cannabis.

What do you wish you knew when you started out cannabis entrepreneurship?

I wish knew how hard it was going to be. In retrospect, maybe I don’t wish? Maybe if I knew how hard it is, I might not have… but it is some of the most rewarding five years of my life.

Finally, what are three things people don’t know about what it takes to be a cannabis entrepreneur?

I think, number one, it will take more time and money than you can possibly predict. Number two: believe in what it is that you’re doing and listen to consumer demand. Keeping the consumer at the center of things, you’re more likely to be successful. Number three: I get a lot of advice from other folks in the business. This is one of the friendliest industries I’ve ever been a part of.

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