#cannabisaficionado

Cannabis

Cannabinoid-Based Medicine: How and Why Is Cannabis Medicine?

Despite a more than 5,000 year history of safe, medicinal cannabis use, science is just starting to understand cannabinoid-based medicine.

Published

on

Cannabinoid-Based Medicine
PHOTO | Don Goofy
Advertisement Overdrive

Weed. Drug. Banned substance. Medicine. The cannabis plant goes by many monikers.

Recent history has vilified what ancient history commended. Now, as more and more people around the world gain access to cannabis, it’s become better known for its therapeutic properties.

Millions of American use cannabis every day to help treat symptoms of conditions that range from epilepsy to PTSD, cancer, to nausea. Patients most commonly use it to treat chronic pain, and symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, arthritis, insomnia and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to name a few.

But, what makes marijuana medicinal? The (short) answer is cannabinoids.

Cannabinoids – or phytocannabinoids – are the naturally occurring group of active chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. There are over 100 different cannabinoids; some of the most well known are Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD).

Both CBD and THC are the main chemicals used in cannabis-based medicine. But, each cannabinoid has a different effect on the body (not all are known). THC is known for the psychoactive or high effect it induces. CBD, on the other hand, is non-psychoactive.

In fact, most cannabinoids do not have psychoactive effects. Each is thought to influence the body in different ways. Research suggests that some cannabinoids like cannabinol (CBN) treat symptoms associated with inflammation or pain, while others (THC, CBD) have neuroprotective qualities.

Individual cannabinoids can be isolated and extracted, or synthesized. The concept is used in the development of synthetic cannabinoid-based medicines, such as Marinol. Isolating compounds allows humans to reap the benefits of particular cannabinoids. However, it’s believed that these chemicals work most effectively when used together, known as the entourage effect.

Understanding Cannabinoid-Based Medicine

So, how do these compounds actually affect our bodies?

When consumed, cannabinoids activate or trigger receptors. Those receptors are found throughout our bodies – e.g. organs, nervous system, brain, connective tissue, immune cells, glands, etc. – and help make up the endocannabinoid system (ECS), a biochemical communication system within our bodies.

To oversimplify: If cannabinoids were keys, receptors are the locks. Once unlocked, receptors send messages to cells.

Researchers have so far found two types of receptors: CB1 and CB2. Each has a different role to play, and each responds differently to various cannabinoids. (There are other receptors thought to engage with cannabinoids, but these are the main ones).

The highest concentration of CB1 receptors is found in the brain and in the spinal cord. CB2 receptors are predominantly found in immune cells and GI tract.

Interestingly, high densities of CB1 receptors are found in the hippocampus, cerebellum and other regions in the brain responsible for regulating appetite, mood, memory, etc. They’re also found in nerve endings.

Due to the concentration of CB2 receptors in immune cells, they are thought to help the body respond to disease.

These receptors are also activated by our body’s own cannabinoids aka endocannabinoids. One such endocannabinoid is anandamide or the bliss molecule. It’s a neurotransmitter that’s produced on demand by the body when it’s needed. Anandamide is fragile, like all other neurotransmitters. It’s known to regulate mood, appetite, pain, cell regulation, and even reproduction.

A scientific study published last year was the latest to focus the research community on the potential of the GPR55 receptor, which is now known to be the third identified receptor.

Unlike most other cannabinoids, research suggests that CBD does not directly bind to the receptors mentioned above. Instead, it’s believed to help build up our body’s supply of anandamide. It does this by inhibiting the FAAH enzymes that deplete levels of anandamide, and other endocannabinoids.

Despite a more than 5,000 year history of safe, medicinal cannabis use, science is just starting to understand cannabinoids, cannabinoid-based medicine and the ECS. What we do know about this complex system is that it has a vital role to play in the human body.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cannabis

The Sativa Preservation Society Project Will Protect Rare Haze Genetics

Published

on

Sativa Preservation Society Project
PHOTO | SATIVA PRESERVATION SOCIETY PROJECT

Space Coyote, the totally cosmic cannabis company, has launched the Sativa Preservation Society Project — a movement that protects Haze genetics while paying homage to the custodians and cultivators who kept the seeds alive.

Celebrators of the cannabis culture’s stoner heritage, Space Coyote’s aesthetic and ethos embraces the vibes and psychedelic Seventies scene, where the creativity and community of cannabis intersect.

Co-founder and self-confessed ‘Sativa Diva’ Libby Cooper calls it the “ultimate passion project”. 

“We’re truly passionate about saving these genetics that are the actual grandmothers of every modern-day sativa strains that people love — all of these desert strains, all of the fruity strains,” Cooper tells me from the Space Coyote van en route to Hall of Flowers.

Founding the Sativa Preservation Society Project

The concept of the Sativa Preservation Society Project was years in incubation as the Space Coyote team deliberated over how to bring it to life. It was important for them to give back to the community while helping to educate about the history of cannabis culture.

The stars aligned earlier this year when the team met Bam Vachher-Gnanathurai, nursery and plant breeding manager from the Posibl Project in Salina. A mutual love of the unique effects of Haze genetics made for a truly cosmic outcome.

“Bam is super passionate about sativa,” said Cooper. “When we went and met up with Bam for the very first time, he rolled a blunt from Cuban Black. It was such an amazing experience to smoke that flower.” 

“The initial conversation of the Sativa Preservation Society coming to life happened during that smoke session. It was like, ‘holy shit, we could actually do this.’”

The Haze Experience

The Sativa Preservation Society Project is launching with three incredibly rare cultivars — Cuban Black Haze, Uptown Haze (also known as A5 Haze), and C5 Haze — all of which were originally cultivated in the 1980s by legendary grower Neville Schoenmaker. The flower will be available as bagged eighths and as infused prerolls.

Cooper likens the Haze experience to being “a bit like mushrooms” — colors are brighter, your smell is enhanced and your hearing is sharper.

“It’s really like a cup of coffee without any jitteriness or anxiety usually associated with sativas. This is pure energy without any sort of adverse effects,” explains Cooper. “You really feel as if your eyelids are getting peeled back — you’re awake, you’re uplifted. Basically, I smoke it and I immediately start stretching.”

“Many sativa genetics are dying out due to a number of reasons,” says Cooper. “Typically, they are more difficult to grow, have a longer curing time, and the fluffy buds are easily crushed in transit.” All of which makes sativas less cost-effective in California’s highly competitive legal market.

“This truly is the first time these original sativa strains are going to be commercially grown,” says Cooper. “It really wouldn’t have been possible, funnily enough, without this group named Posibl.”

Learn more about the Sativa Preservation Society Project in the video above. While you’re at it, find your nearest Space Coyote here.

Continue Reading

Cannabis

Peach Oz: This Sweet And Juicy Cultivar Will Stimulate Your Creativity

Published

on

PEACH FUZZ | PHOTO: WONDERBRETT

If you’re looking for a premium cultivar with legendary genetics and a euphoric high, look no further than Peach Oz, the latest addition to Wonderbrett’s stellar strain menu.

A cross of Peach Rings with OZ Kush and a descendent of Zkittlez, the sweet, stimulating citrus taste profile of Peach Oz will get your creative juices flowing.

While the cultivar may be new to the public, according to Wonderbrett Co-Founder and famed Breeder Brett Feldman, it’s five-years-old in the world of genetics.

“There’s only a small handful of heady smokers who follow these things,” says Feldman. “I wanted to bring it to the masses to share the experience with everybody. That’s where my passion comes from with this strain. Similar to an amazing dish at a restaurant, you want to share it with your friends.”

Grown in small-batches at scale from the company’s state-of-the-art Long Beach cultivation facility, the strain was first created by Dying Breed Seeds, then perfected by Cannabis By Corey, before making its way to Feldman.

Wonderbrett’s grow room | PHOTO: Courtesy Wonderbrett

Bursting with flavors and aromas that bring to mind the sweet ocean breeze and fragrant fruit orchards of the California sunshine state, Peach OZ’s four dominant terpenes: Caryophyllene, Linalool, Limonene and Humulene, create a distinct sweet taste of ripe peaches, citrus candy and cream.  

“When any strain has that unique, recognizable consistency in its flavor, whether that be peach, lemon or orange, that’s what myself and other breeders appreciate most and look for when bringing a genetic like this to market. It’s mind-blowing what Peach OZ can do that, translating a fruit flavor to a smoking experience,” explained Feldman.

Peach OZ is available at select dispensary and at Wonderbrett’s flagship dispensary in L.A.

Continue Reading

Cannabis

Pink Lemonade: This Sparkling Strain Is Both Pretty & Potent

The frosted pink buds of Pink Lemonade might dazzle the beholder with glittering layer of golden trichomes, but this gorgeous flower isn’t all looks.

Published

on

Pink Lemonade
PHOTO | Anna Wilcox

Dusted with a glittering layer of golden trichomes, the Pink Lemonade strain is endowed with a mystical appearance that embodies everything curious, attractive, and intriguing about cannabis flowers. Tightly bound calyxes dazzle with a bouquet of pink, violet, and sage coloration.

Cracking open one of these flowers emits a comfortable herbal aroma. A burst of crispness teases the nose, somewhat akin to the tart fizz in a carbonated cherry drink. This dessert-like aroma nicely compliments a definite happy hour high. Calm, relaxed, and downright chill, Pink Lemonade is a true afternoon delight.

The Pink Lemonade High

Put on some chill beats and pour yourself a nice drink. This plant is smooth, easy, and well-rounded. If inhaling Pink Lemonade feels like the first meaningful breath you’ve taken all day, you might be pleasantly surprised as a subtle relaxation works its way along the limbs and through the muscles.

There’s no doubt about it–this plant is a go-to strain for mellowing out. While often described as thoughtful and creative, the herb is better suited to leisure activities than it is serious concentration.

While solo consumers may enjoy putting on some Netflix after a little of this plant, it’s peaceful and contented nature is ideal for social gatherings. Spending time with friends may always be fun, but it’s easy to sit back enjoy a pleasant conversation after a few tastes of Pink Lemonade.

It’s worth mentioning, however, that cannabis affects everyone differently. The herb tends to be a mood enhancer rather than an instant remedy for happiness. If you are in an easygoing and relaxed environment, expect even more mellow after enjoying a little bud. If you’ve been having a bad day, strains like Pink Lemonade may provide relief by softening negative emotions and making them more tolerable.

Pink Lemonade Strain Background

Today’s cannabis market is truly a craft one. To say that the lack of federal recognition of the herb is problematic is an understatement. However, one benefit of state-by-state legalization is the development of truly local, expertly crafted products.

Pink Lemonade is a superb example of such a flower. There are many renditions of Pink Lemonade out there, yet the particular version pictured is a cross between two contemporary hybrids, Lemon Cheesecake and Huckleberry Soda.

Each parent strain is exceptional in its own right. Lemon Cheesecake is a sativa-dominant flower with a sour cream aroma and substantial THC production. Huckleberry Soda is a craft hybrid from Annunkanki Genetics, an intriguing cross between two hybrids, Black Cherry Soda and Huckleberry Hound.

Pink Lemonade Strain Benefits

As a craft flower, Pink Lemonade was arguably bred more for enjoyment than serious medical potential. It’s frosted pink buds dazzle the beholder, showcasing the fact that this plant is truly a treat. However, this gorgeous flower isn’t all looks.

The flower produces upwards of 25 percent THC. This means that the plant may be useful to those who benefit from high-THC therapies. Those interested in making a full-extract oil, hash, or other forms of concentrates may also enjoy experimenting with this sugary herb.

This plant is not too energizing nor is it overly sedative. However, those hoping for a little extra help falling asleep at night may find the flower helpful. The relaxed flower may also be beneficial for anxious individuals in search of a social lubricant.

However, the high-THC content in Pink Lemonade can inspire the opposite effect in some people. Bottom line: if you are prone to social anxiety or often respond poorly to THC, this potent flower is likely not the best choice.

Continue Reading

Trending

Join The Cannabis Aficionado Community!<br> <span>Join the Cannabis Aficionado community and receive all of the most relevant news geared towards our sophisticated enthusiast community.</span>

Copyright © Cannabis Aficionado 2021