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This Cali Company Wants to Light Your Bowl with Space Lasers

The B-LAZE laser bong by SiliconCali is a highdea so incredibly inventive that only true stoner ingenuity could bring it to life.

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B-LAZE
PHOTO | SiliconCali
Eaze

You know those ideas you get when you are really high? The ideas you think could actually be something. You stay up all night smoking more weed, planning every little detail only to wake up the next morning and realize you can’t remember half of what you planned. The great highdeas.

This isn’t one of those highdeas. This vision burns much brighter. So bright in fact that you need safety glasses to properly utilize the technology SilconCali is producing. The Bay Area startup is building a more exciting future and they’re doing it by combining the mechanics of a conventional glass bong with app-enabled, laser technology and other exciting approaches to firing up a bowl.

B-LAZE Laser Bong: Never Smoke a Boring Bowl Again

The flagship technology from SiliconCali is the B-LAZE Laser Bong; a hand-blown, glass bong lit by LEDs that uses a laser to ignite the bowl while leveraging other automation to optimize the experience. The battery-powered laser bong uses wireless induction charging to recharge the device using an electromagnetic field from a charging dock. The B-LAZE is a highdea so incredibly inventive that only true stoner ingenuity could bring it to life.

So why would you ever need a laser bong? To find out why you would ever need a laser bong and what inspired its creation I sat down for a chat with SiliconCali founder and B-LAZE creator, Justin Zelaya.

“It’s simple!” Zelaya explains. “I was tired of boring products.” He wanted to create a fun, unique way to enjoy cannabis but more than anything this project is about creating an exciting future. It’s less about getting high or jumping into the booming cannabis industry.


Not long ago, Zelaya was operating a headshop-technology shop hybrid in San Francisco’s renowned Haight Ashbury. In a city known for disruptive technology, in a neighborhood rooted as the epicenter of the counterculture. What better place could cannabis and technology collide so fantastically?

Zelaya’s passion for the project and company comes from his enthusiasm for all things tech. He’s a self-taught electrical engineer who wanted to learn how to build drones. So he studied ways to engineer everything from microcontrollers to batteries and more. He explains that “learning how to make drones taught me how to build pretty much every electrical component I could imagine.”

To secure funding and build a proper foundation for the company Zelaya got his idea backed by bitcoin billionaires. Which is necessary because combining modern laser technology with traditional functional art glass is no small feat. Innovation like this takes heavy investment in time, energy, and resources. The different glass designs alone cost thousands of dollars and countless hours devoted to building functional versions of different concepts.

Zelaya has spent the last year and a half iterating on different design prototypes. He shared his vision with fifty or sixty different glassblowers before finding one willing to give it a shot. All of them saying similar things. ‘It’s too complicated.’ ‘It can’t be done.’ It wasn’t until he met N3rd Glass that he found someone to work with. “N3rd was the first to say, ‘It won’t work, but what if we redesign?”

Since finalizing the initial the design with N3rd, SilconCali has turned to Santa Cruz Glass to efficiently scale production and help them bring the B-LAZE to market. Zelaya does some of the glasswork, too. Adding abrasion, sandblasting, and other final coldworking details during the final stages of production.

How Does the Laser Bong Work?

Just like any other bong… sort of. You load the bowl with your flower of choice like you normally would but then instead of sparking a lighter, you use the mobile app to fire the specially-tuned laser. But not before you put on the safety glasses that the B-LAZE comes with. Once the laser is engaged the bowl slowly spins thanks to a small set of gears; spinning and combusting the material as it turns. Using a wider optical setting you can diffuse the pinpoint heat of the laser to effectively vaporize flower.

How hot the laser actually gets is somewhat impossible to answer because it only gets as hot as the material it interacts with. The heat from the 2w laser is designed for flower and programmed to target cannabinoids specifically. The color and consistency of your flower can affect the way the laser works. Zelaya gave the example that red lasers don’t burn red material well. Luckily for us, good weed is mostly green and purple.

It’s not a lightsaber either, so it won’t slice your limbs off but you still should be careful with it. The laser can sting if it hits your skin and the bright spectrum of light is not good for your eyesight. Hence the need to use safety glasses.

Using the mobile app, you can fire the laser and control its color, choosing from over six million color combinations. You can adjust the speed the bowl spins and with constant updates to the firmware more features are on the way.

When asked how to clean it, Zelaya claims it’s the first thing people want to know and that keeping the piece clean is simple. It is essentially the same as any other bong except you don’t ever want to put it under running water to flush it out. Instead, drain the water chamber from the small cap on the bottom of the bong and give it a  simple rinse with isopropyl alcohol or whatever cleaner you prefer for your glassware.

To Infiniti and Beyond

With a bong so technically advanced, the only thing left to do is tackle the final frontier, space. Zelaya was excited to share that in a way they are already working towards that future.

Currently, you can only fire the laser on the B-LAZE using Bluetooth technology. But soon you’ll be able to engage the laser using WiFi. To take it one step further, SiliconCali is building a satellite internet hub for their new facility that will allow them to centralize all signals being sent to and from laser bongs from around the globe.

So, anytime a B-LAZE is fired the activation signal will be sent to satellites in space and beamed back down to the precise location of the laser bong. That means even if you’re a world apart you’ll be able to fire a friend’s laser bong with the tap of your phone screen by beaming the signal off satellites as they orbit the planet. Which basically gives you the most futuristic way to enjoy cannabis. What a time to be alive!

Innovative Additions

Beside bong tokes from space, SiliconCali is making ongoing updates to the B-LAZE as well as designing other new, exciting laser-powered products. Some of the new features they are working on include full gimbaling of the bowl which will you more control over where you want to fire the laser as well as play with shapes and messages as you burn your herb

Other application and firmware updates like voice command are on the horizon, too. Zelaya’s excitement peaks as he imagines coming home to a pre-packed bowl and saying the command, “SIRI, light my bowl.” His laughter trailing off as he describes some additional games and data capabilities he’s building so that you can compete with friends for the longest rip and other data measuring competitions.

Right now, the required safety glasses block out the intense laser beam altogether, but soon the mobile app will give you the ability to view the laser in full color directly on your phone’s screen.

Currently, the laser bong is not designed for concentrates. That would require a different and more powerful laser but SiliconCali is already working on a version that will make laser dabs a reality.

Development is also underway to essentially turn any bong into a fantasy future bong with the use of their plasma bowl — a plasma-powered bowl piece that functions like the B-LAZE and fits most standard size glass fittings.

Want Your Own Laser Bong?

You can preorder your own B-LAZE on the SiliconCali’s website and for $2,400 you can get one of the 45 originals from the first production run. After they’re gone new models will be released but this is your chance to get the laser bong as it was originally designed. You can also find them in a few headshops sprinkled throughout the states.

If you want to check out some of the features for the B-LAZE you can download the app for free in the Google Play and Apple App stores. Download it now to control the laser bong and new devices as they get released.

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Culture

Cannabis Legalization IS a Civil Rights Issue

Social equity is important to help people of color move on from the racist inquisition of cannabis prohibition. It’s a Civil Rights issue.

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Civil Rights
PHOTO | Alex Brandon

Americans have the right to political and social freedom and equality, as guaranteed by the Constitution. But reflecting on how this country was founded, there is no doubt the reason the U.S. is a superpower today is because the colonists and subsequent immigrants who became the industrialists had free labor through ownership of slaves to build their homesteads, ranches, companies and corporations.

The country would never have the infrastructure it does in terms of roads, buildings and power supplies if it was not for slave labor of people of color. This incomprehensible display of racism has attributed to the empires of American families with names like Rockefeller, Forbes, Vanderbilt and Griswold, to name only a few. The freedom of slaves and later the civil rights movement were pivotal moments of liberty for American people of color, who were not given the same rights to political and social freedom and equality that the Constitution guaranteed.

The legalization of cannabis can also create a huge shift in the Civil Rights of Americans.

Cannabis, Civil Rights and Reefer Madness

After the Civil War, the Jim Crow laws enacted racial segregation and the legal principle “separate but equal.” This carried into schooling, transportation and public facilities. Not until 1954, when the landmark decision in Brown vs. Board of Education was handed down, did segregation become unconstitutional. Though it took years to implement the decisions, the Supreme Court continued to hand down rulings against the Jim Crow laws. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 were the last laws to help overturn the institutional discrimination.

However, during this period, in 1942, the Japanese Internment took place and people were suspected of committing crimes against the country during WWII solely because of their Japanese ancestry. The abusive move by the American government to substitute race and national origin for evidence is today recognized as shameful and a horrific event in our country’s history. The admission a sign that times are changing.

While laws and policy remove these intolerable acts of American racism on paper, the psychology and education for reform within people is taking longer to change. Decades after the Civil Rights Act was passed, many are still being targeted for the color of their skin, often being stopped at airports, pulled over in traffic and experiencing Constitutional violations of the 4th Amendment, for search and seizure. Official denials and insufficient proof have upheld these behaviors.

Again, in a country not above using skin color as evidence, the prohibition of cannabis in the mid-1930s started a wave of incarceration for people of color who use, grow, or sell marijuana. Harry Anslinger, the first commissioner of the U.S. Treasury Department’s Federal Bureau of Narcotics, made it his mission to seek out jazz musicians who used ‘marihuana.’ His internal memos berated jazz, reading, “It sounded like the jungles in the dead of night.” A different memo cautioned, “Unbelievably ancient indecent rites of the East Indies are resurrected.” And that the lives of jazz players “reek of filth.” He hoped to round up all-black jazz musicians and famously went after singer Billy Holiday for her heroin use — while helping white actress Judy Garland with her “troubled addiction” to heroin and wouldn’t dare arrest her.

“Prohibition was always used to eliminate people from this society and make it harder for them. It was part of the greater effort to continue what our country was unfortunately built on, slavery,” shared Allison Margolin, a Los Angeles-based criminal defense and cannabis attorney who has been heavily involved with California cannabis licensing and criminal drug cases.

Systemic racism leftover from the founders of this country gave way to modern racial profiling by law enforcement and the judiciary courts. The drug war greenlit in the 1980s increased the Jim Crow hysteria for cannabis tenfold, as rogue policy led to training DEA agents to look for people of color to pull over, especially if they’re black and driving expensive cars.

Cannabis was villainized by ‘reefer madness’ and in its own Jim Crow nightmare — no matter the American right to control our body and mind, covered in the opening words of the Declaration of Independence, which guarantees “right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Freedom of thought is also guaranteed by the first amendment. The prohibition of cannabis was unconstitutional from the get-go.

But, evolution pushes at humanity and while today humans are under attack by their own species, many people are choosing a higher consciousness over slavery. Prohibition can’t be justified on moral or legal ground. The American Medical Association and the Federal Drug Administration have denied the truth about drugs when they come in conflict with government policies and corporate agendas, but thanks to democracy, cannabis is being freed from illegality and stigma, one state at a time. In a groundbreaking national effort, on November 19th, 2019, The House Judiciary Committee voted 24-10 to advance the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, sponsored by Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY). If passed by Congress, the U.S. is looking at ending federal cannabis prohibition completely.

The MORE Act would remove marijuana from the list of federally controlled substances, authorize the provision of resources, funded by an excise tax on marijuana products, to address the needs of communities that have been most seriously impacted by the war on drugs and provide for the expungement of federal marijuana convictions and arrests.

First Nations people, the Native Americans who lived in North America before the Europeans invaded, have begun to open dispensaries and cultivation businesses on their reservations. With sovereign immunity from the U.S., the MORE Act will only change things slightly. Josh Grant, an IIPAY Tribe member and president of the IIPAY Economic Development Board, explained, “Let’s say the Fed pass the MORE Act and they put regulations in place, now do we want to give up our sovereign immunity and start operating on federal regulations? Do we want to waive our sovereign immunity and start functioning on state regulation? Probably not. Do we want to make our own regulations that fold these other ones in? Yes, we do.”

Not All Social Equity is Created Equal

Racial profiling is responsible for putting many people of color behind bars for cannabis. Expungement may be a huge win for America but what about reparations? While 40 acres and a mule was a Civil War promise never realized, Native Americans have long suffered in displacement and Mexicans completely shunned in the face of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, cannabis legalization in many states has promised to develop and implement policies that seek to center equity in cannabis policy reform.

Grant shares how deep these reforms are needed for First Nations people.

“What about tribal sovereignty and our ability and our inherent right to provide for our people by any means necessary? When we have elders without power and their houses are falling apart, when we have children without housing, without heat, without running water, when we have third-world conditions on our reservation, shouldn’t we be allowed under our tribal sovereignty to provide an economic plan to try to help these people with the proper dispersal of profit or income to cover the tribe? There’s a major civil right.

“What they’re violating is our tribal sovereignty by restricting us from having a free market to develop our resources to provide for our people. That’s first and foremost here. We’re talking first nations here; we’re talking first people. We’ve been pushed into a corner of worthless land, while the bulk of our territory has been taken and government entities are collecting taxes on that land without remitting a portion of those taxes back to the original people.”

Social equity programs hope to repair the damage done by the war on drugs and assist equitable ownership and employment opportunities in the cannabis industry to decrease disparities in low-income and marginalized communities.

Margolin explained the importance of social equity within the legalization framework, “I think that it’s one of the first times that any of the governmental bodies in the United States has chosen attempt at reparations in any kind of way shape or form. I think there’s obviously a lot that could be done to try to increase the power of social equity applicants. Most of those have to do with access to banking, not having to rely upon individuals or potential conglomerates who might make deals that aren’t like the best, but its better than nothing. It’s definitely a good beginning.”

But is social equity working? While all legal states do not have the same social equity programs, at the local level, cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles are trying to set up stronger programs to combat the barriers to enter the cannabis business and offer employment and business ownership opportunities.

Allison Margolin commented on the effectiveness of Los Angeles Social Equity Program,

“There’s social equity issues that will arrive, like we had this whole thing with the electronic first come, first serve, that became a situation and had levels of unfairness. But I think that if we fairly increase the number of dispensaries allowed, there’s no cap and we relax in the sensitive use requirements and if the state has certain requirements for the social equity on the local level that’d be great. Also, if the state-mandated there wouldn’t be a dry county, we could fix this huge disparity between the philosophy of before — the philosophy that’s supposed to be underpinning all of this and going on in these local governments, which is like reefer madness.

“Without the local governments being on board right now we don’t have too much access and that affects the whole market. We need to have more retail. We need to have more state-mandated social equity ownership requirements. But even with those things, yes, people can make money but there are a lot of control issues and the ability to control the market. Otherwise social equity can have benefits.”

States like Illinois and Massachusetts made social equity an integral part of their cannabis legalization. In states that didn’t, like Oregon, the city of Portland stepped up and granted eligibility for reduced license fees to businesses whose owners or staff had previous marijuana convictions; and in 2016, they enacted a city marijuana sales tax to generate funds for economic and education programs in communities where drug laws were disproportionately enforced.

Finding a happy medium for reparations can make sure who is supposed to benefit does, but there are many ways to create categories that were maybe not defined outright. For example, in Los Angeles, there is a three-tier social equity program with many different qualifications and benefits. A workforce requirement has a good faith effort to employ 50% of the weekly hourly workforce from the residents living within a three-mile radius of the cannabis business premises, with 20% social equity workers and 10% transitional workers. There are ways to make opportunities for everyone.

The Importance of Social Equity

Just as vital to understanding that legalization is a civil rights issue, is to be aware of the campaign of disinformation by the government. America is a nation with so many elephants in the room. It’s a zoo. Conscious evolution aside, changes can be made through policy and social equity is a good start.

“Reparations need to happen in the country in order for the United States to survive. Basically, this can be a good beginning to how we start it,” Margolin said. The people who have gone to prison for cannabis had to hire attorneys, had to be bailed out and they lost their jobs. “There should be a way for those people to benefit first economically. In addition to all these laws, the financing needs to be opened up, so passing state and federal banking is part of the effort because then you can have government-mandated funds and specialty programs. But now, you’re basically on your own unless you’re part of a bigger conglomerate, which might be like a big management company or otherwise you’re just in not of good positioning power,” she added.

Social equity is important to help people of color move on from the racist inquisition of cannabis prohibition. Margolin expressed that her grandparents were Holocaust survivors and received reparations from the Germans during her entire life. “They weren’t bitter towards Germans. They had no issues with Germans. Actually they’re both from Poland and they never went back there because they said there was so much anti-Semitism, but they went to Germany.”

The emotional and psychological trauma of racism is a scar this entire nation will carry until it can become completely transparent and make amends. Cannabis legalization is a gigantic step towards equality for all.

Margolin adds, “Basically the drug war and the war with cannabis has always been about taking things that are basic human needs and basic human impulses, which are the right to alter our consciousness on a level that’s pretty nuanced and not bad for you and punishing people for something most everyone does or that many people do.”

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Culture

Maximize Your Dry January Enjoyment With Daytrip CBD Beverages

Daytrip has developed a range of natural, premium CBD beverages that delight the senses and open the mind to new possibilities.

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PHOTOS | Daytrip

Do you feel like you overindulged over the holiday season? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. After all the festivities of the Christmas and New Year’s period, some people decide to commit to a month of sobriety, otherwise known as ‘Dry January.’

Researchers at the University of Sussex have been studying Dry January since 2014. They have discovered that participants can expect to have better health – and a healthier bank balance.

But fear not! Dry January doesn’t mean forgoing all things deliciously effervescent. In fact, why not use this opportunity to embark on a new facet of your wellness journey by swapping out sugary sodas with sugar-free CBD beverages.

Daytrip craft natural, premium 100% water-soluble CBD drinks that absorb quickly into the body to maximize the cannabinoid’s bioavailability. CBD is an oil-based product, so when the technology doesn’t create a fully water-soluble CBD, the end product can’t effectively absorb into the body.

For this reason, Daytrip is different from other CBD drink options. The company has developed proprietary Foliole Nexus Technology, leveraging high-frequency energy to minimize the hemp-derived CBD’s particle size, enabling the cannabinoid to provide a near-instant effect and deliver consistent results.

Then, they infuse CBD into sparkling water and a botanical terpene profile to create four delicious flavors — cherry, coconut pineapple, lemon lime and tangerine — that can be used to create CBD cocktails that promote a happy effervescent feeling.

The Daytripper

  • 3/4 cup lemon lime Daytrip CBD sparkling water
  • Ginger – muddled
  • ¼ cup peach nectar
  • 1 lemon wedge

Combine all ingredients in a glass and garnish with lemon and a ginger shaving.

The Daytripper

The Bubbly Brunch

  • 1/2 cup Tangerine Daytrip CBD Sparkling Water
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 TBSP elderflower syrup
  • 1 lime wedge squeezed into glass

Combine all ingredients in a glass.

The Fiesta

  • 2 oz Cherry Daytrip CBD Sparkling Water
  • 5 oz tequila
  • 2 oz pineapple juice
  • 1 oz pomegranate juice

Combine all ingredients in a glass and garnish with cherries and orange slices.

The Fiesta

Endless Summer

  • ½ can Coconut Pineapple Daytrip CBD Sparkling Water
  • 1 shot clear rum
  • 2 slices of fresh pineapple Ice

Muddle one slice of pineapple and pour in Daytrip Coconut Pineapple, rum and ice. Garnish with the second pineapple slice

Firmly rooted in California culture, Daytrip embraces all that the Golden State represents; getting away from the grind and sharing good vibes.

Whether you’re at the beach, on the slopes, or simply in your own back yard, Daytrip wants to help you maximize your enjoyment.

Use code DRYJAN to save 20% off your purchase.

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Culture

The K.Haring Collection Is the Embodiment of Functional Art

The new K.Haring Collection is the epitome of his artistic style — vibrant yet sophisticated, stylish yet accessible and extremely enjoyable. 

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K.Haring Collection
PHOTOS | K. Haring Collection

Keith Haring is undoubtedly one of the most influential artists of the 1980s. His graffiti-inspired artwork depicted simplified people, barking dogs and flying saucers worked into tightly arranged patterns. He drew inspiration from popular culture that surrounded him in New York City and beyond, his work could be found in all its bright, graphic glory in the streets, in clubs and the subway.

So it makes perfect sense then that the new K.Haring Collection is the epitome of his artistic style — vibrant yet sophisticated, stylish yet accessible and extremely enjoyable.

“The art world has long had an intertwined relationship with cannabis and has in many ways been instrumental in the advancement of the industry,” said Sasha Kadey, Chief Marketing Officer of Greenlane and Creative Director for the K.Haring Collection.

“The K.Haring Collection will help our mission to destigmatize and elevate the cannabis experience.”

The ten-piece collection is being released through Greenlane Holdings Inc and includes some of Haring’s most recognizable work in four colorways. It includes all of the essentials for an elevated smoking experience: bubblers, rigs, water pipes, tasters, spoon pipes, glass trays, and catchalls. A collaboration with BiC completes the collection with eight distinct lighters in bold hues that feature a range of the artist’s dynamic designs.

Peep the full collection below.

K.Haring Tray, $60

K.Haring Collection

K.Haring Spoon, $50

K.Haring Rig, $180

K.Haring Collection

K.Haring Bubbler, $120

K.Haring Water Pipe, $220

K.Haring Collection

K.Haring Taster, $30

K.Haring Angel Catchall, $60

BiC collaboration

The K.Haring Collection is available now from haringglass.com.

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